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  • ec3782a 5:28 pm on March 28, 2014 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , skills   

    Skills Gained at Grameen 

    First off: my advice to every intern is to make sure you write down all of the skills/tools you gain, learn, or develop during your internship. This way you can discuss them specifically in an interview and won’t forget to add them to your resume. I keep mine written in the front cover of my internship notebook so I can refer to them at times like this 🙂

    Fortunately, this internship has given me a variety of projects that have allowed me to tap into and develop a wide range of skills. I’ve been exposed to the Salesforce system which Grameen uses to keep track of employees, volunteers, projects—(aka just about EVERYTHING). This cloud based system allows us to keep all of our data and information in one location that’s accessible to whoever needs it. Additionally, I’ve become savvy on Google + and all the tools that Google offers. In addition to webinars, video conferencing, and other basic functions, I’ve become good at using Smartsheet which is a fantastic fusion of Google docs, forms, and excel. I use it to keep track of my own tasks as well as the incoming fellowship applications, our marketing campaign, and many other things. It’s an adaptable and highly useful tool.

    More broadly I’ve worked on projects that exercised my abilities in the following areas: (More …)

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  • Zach C. Cohen 5:24 am on July 5, 2013 Permalink
    Tags: coding, , , IT, , skills, , web   

    ‘Are you studying IT?’ 

    Rough draft of my most recent story for PBS Idea Lab, complete with handwritten HTML

    Rough draft of my most recent story for PBS Idea Lab, complete with handwritten HTML

    That’s what one passenger asked me on my most recent interstate bus trip. I don’t consider myself an IT specialist, but I’m honored by the misunderstanding.

    I traveled often this summer, back and forth to my home in D.C. and spending time with family in New Jersey and New York City. On this particular bus ride, I was on deadline for a story on the Knight Foundation News Challenge’s #OpenGov grant winners.

    I usually write my stories for PBS directly in our content management system so I can format the story with pictures and links as I’m writing the content.

    It’s a lot easier than the alternative, which is handwriting all of the basic formatting code in HTML (bolditalicized, links, video embeds, etc.) But Internet was unreliable on that bus, so writing the story along with the code in plain text made more sense.

    A year or so ago, that would have been inconceivable for me. I’m no Luddite, but I’m certainly not a tech genius. I still don’t consider myself fluent in code. But from my time in classes at AU, internships and at The Eagle has slowly taught me some basics.

    In fact, every single internship I’ve ever had has require that I produce my own stories online.

    Those online skills, rudimentary as they might be, have been a huge boon for me. I work in an industry that requires digital literacy, and I’m happy that I have started that path. I’ve also gotten some practice in audio editing from my work in Latin Pulse, and all of those help me become a better journalist.

    And code, like any language, is one best learned by practice, not in lectures. In this regard, the value of hands-on education in this regard, whether on the newsroom, in the classroom, or on a bus, cannot be overstated.

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  • nn1702a 4:46 pm on November 29, 2011 Permalink
    Tags: , , , skills, ,   

    The Era of Social Media In the Work Place 

    I have been learning a lot while interning, especially through utilizing social media sites for promoting the company I intern for. I am given the task every week to update our Facebook group by posting current events and which opportunities are available for American businesses to take advantage of in the Middle Eastern market. My organization not only uses Facebook, but Twitter and LinkedIn as well.

    It is obvious that in today’s world, social media is the new and most efficient way to communicate. You can reach so many people and have them keep up to date with what is going on, so it makes sense why literally everyone and everything has a Twitter or a Facebook page. I’m really glad that I have been having the opportunity to work with social media at my internship because it has made me put it to good use, rather than being on Facebook for fun or being on it as I procrastinate.

    I’m actually an administrator for my internship’s Facebook page and I constantly post links to their events and press releases, which has really helped me to better my social media skills. I have realized to be more careful and aware when typing by not doing so in slang and fully spelling words instead of using abbreviations. I think it has also made me more conscious when communicating online, especially through emails because it shows a sign of professionalism. Only with friends will I write informally, so I have learned to separate my form of communication by remembering who my audience is.

    Consequently, I have definitely understood the extent to which social media is a crucial marketing tool for businesses and organizations. It really is a key technique of promoting a site or business and a powerful strategy that will get them links, attention, and massive amounts of traffic. Since it is the most popular way to communicate in today’s society, I think everyone should try and learn how to use Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, LinkedIn, and Google+ for professional purposes rather than for pleasure. It is a great skill to acquire and to put on your resume. I know that when I was applying for internships this past summer, many asked for “good communication skills.” This not only means writing skills, but that potential candidates should have experience and a lot of knowledge when utilizing social media, but for professional purposes. So I’m sure all of everyone’s time spent on Facebook will eventually pay off when they will be working or interning!

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  • Sophie Grumelard 2:25 am on November 15, 2011 Permalink
    Tags: , conflict management, conflict resolution, Lund, skills   

    Sometimes, scanning is not a bad thing! 

    So, the other day I had to learn how to scan something, using one of those monster-Canon machines (yes, I know, scanning is easy…when you are not using a machine that has 30 different options on it). Scanning, copying and everything that falls in the category are usually the things you hope to stay away from at an internship, right? Well, that’s what I thought too, until….it allowed me to introduce myself to someone I really admire. You see, I work right across the hall from Dr. Michael Lund, a prominent researcher and practitioner in the field of conflict management (conflict management involves acquiring skills related to conflict resolution, self-awareness about conflict modes, conflict communication skills, and establishing a structure for management of conflict in one’s environment), and I have read some of his scholarly articles for class. And it just happened that Dr. Lund needed to scan something that day, so I offered to show him how to work some magic on these monster-machines. So, we got to introduce ourselves, talk briefly, and well now…he greets me with my first name, and I talk to him about his readings. I never thought that scanning would be such a valuable skill! So, a piece of advice: never underestimate the power of your most basic skills;)

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