Tagged: Facebook Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Eleanor 8:00 pm on March 2, 2013 Permalink
    Tags: , , breaks, cliche, dos and donts, Facebook, faxing, , , , list,   

    A Tried and True List 

    I didn’t want to seem too eager about this whole blogging thing, so I decided to wait until someone else posted a blog before I wrote another. So I waited. And waited. And waited. And now, I’m just going to post. Because I want to, that’s why.

     

    I want to talk today about balancing creativity in my internship. I’ve been there, oof, 5 times now? I think? It’s been three weeks, but with Presidents’ Day, I got a day off (yup, everyone except AU does, it seems. Perks of working for the government). And while I’ve been here, I’ve been struggling with knowing when to turn on and off my creative brain. If it’s on and I’m doing busy work, I’m falling asleep. If it’s off while I’m writing, I’m just stringing words together without any style. Because people like me like lists, I’ll give you a list today, readers. This is a list for myself and for other interns or future interns.

     

    1)      Find some satisfaction in the mundane: On my second day, I had 99 problems, and faxing was ALL of them. I’m pretty sure I told this joke to all of my friends, so if you groan too I won’t be offended. I literally was assigned to send 99 faxes. I stood next to the fax machine for about an hour and a half, because you can’t send 2 faxes at a time. So there I was, typing, scanning, sending, again  and again. But when I finished with the tedium, I had accomplished something measurable. That stack of 99 letters was boring, but the completed pile was a very fulfilling thing. After work, I found this really funny article about faxing in Japan. Apparently, it’s still a thing there.

    2)      Take your breaks: Most of my life here at IMLS isn’t faxing, it’s writing and researching, which can really zap those brain cells whether it’s a Monday morning or a Thursday afternoon at the end of a long week. Everyone at my office sits at their desks for lunch, and so I do too, but while I’m eating, I’m not doing work. I’m usually reading articles online about stuff that entertains or interests me.

    3)      Stay off Facebook: I haven’t done it yet, and I’m not planning to, but when I do homework, Facebook and Twitter eat my time (I’m not on tumblr for that reason). I used to think that Pintrest was easier to let go of, but it’s really not. I stay off social media even during my breaks, so it’s a treat when I get back home.

    4)      Ask for more: Seriously, this is the most clichéd list of dos and don’ts ever. I’ve read this blog before. But I think there’s a reason this stuff gets said time and time again. Soo, if you run out of work or are stuck on a project, ask to talk about it with your boss/supervisor. Mine was pretty impressed with all the work I’d done, even though I thought it seemed pretty standard. And then she said she’d give me tips, next steps, and more information the next time I come in, after she reads it. Never know if you don’t ask. And being bored all day is so not worth it.

     

    The one thing I don’t have figured out yet is how to not get a headache looking at a computer screen for 6 straight hours. My brain and my eyes hate me at the end of the day.

     

    Thanks for reading through. See you next time.

    EmailShare
     
  • Zach C. Cohen 4:27 am on June 12, 2012 Permalink
    Tags: Airtime, eHarmony, Facebook, , hacked passwords, , , last.fm, , , , transit of Venus,   

    Back to the 9-to-5 

    It’s been a long time since I’ve woken up at 6 a.m. on a regular basis.

    But rather than taking my summer to take a break, I’ve again taken on an internship.

    I’m working three days a week at USA Today’s (absolutely gorgeous) headquarters in McLean, Va. I work in the Tech section, mostly posting short articles about the most recent technology news, publishing copy from the Associated Press wire on our website, and posting our most recent articles on Twitter and Facebook.

    (More …)

    EmailShare
     
  • nn1702a 4:46 pm on November 29, 2011 Permalink
    Tags: Facebook, , , , ,   

    The Era of Social Media In the Work Place 

    I have been learning a lot while interning, especially through utilizing social media sites for promoting the company I intern for. I am given the task every week to update our Facebook group by posting current events and which opportunities are available for American businesses to take advantage of in the Middle Eastern market. My organization not only uses Facebook, but Twitter and LinkedIn as well.

    It is obvious that in today’s world, social media is the new and most efficient way to communicate. You can reach so many people and have them keep up to date with what is going on, so it makes sense why literally everyone and everything has a Twitter or a Facebook page. I’m really glad that I have been having the opportunity to work with social media at my internship because it has made me put it to good use, rather than being on Facebook for fun or being on it as I procrastinate.

    I’m actually an administrator for my internship’s Facebook page and I constantly post links to their events and press releases, which has really helped me to better my social media skills. I have realized to be more careful and aware when typing by not doing so in slang and fully spelling words instead of using abbreviations. I think it has also made me more conscious when communicating online, especially through emails because it shows a sign of professionalism. Only with friends will I write informally, so I have learned to separate my form of communication by remembering who my audience is.

    Consequently, I have definitely understood the extent to which social media is a crucial marketing tool for businesses and organizations. It really is a key technique of promoting a site or business and a powerful strategy that will get them links, attention, and massive amounts of traffic. Since it is the most popular way to communicate in today’s society, I think everyone should try and learn how to use Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, LinkedIn, and Google+ for professional purposes rather than for pleasure. It is a great skill to acquire and to put on your resume. I know that when I was applying for internships this past summer, many asked for “good communication skills.” This not only means writing skills, but that potential candidates should have experience and a lot of knowledge when utilizing social media, but for professional purposes. So I’m sure all of everyone’s time spent on Facebook will eventually pay off when they will be working or interning!

    EmailShare
     
  • Eliza Brashares 5:42 pm on June 22, 2011 Permalink
    Tags: , Facebook, , , tool, , uncomfortable   

    Personal social media enters professional life 

    Everyone and their mother has heard that social media is the new frontier. Here is a list of all our new vocab in case you aren’t up to date on your web 2.0 lingo. Our personal lives were the first targets.  Who remembers Myspace? That’s right: everyone. Myspace’s furious rise and rather anti-climactic fizzle out were just a few short years ago. It was all good fun until you couldn’t log onto myspace without 7 bands wanting to be added as a friend. The infamous “myspace picture” pose will go down as a joke for our generation, and our generation only, will understand. While a few social media sites came before myspace, I was blissfully unaware.

    Then came Facebook; procrastinator extraordinaire, and now everyone and their mom has one. Literally, when my mom got one I was a little weirded out. While its original purpose, I’m sure, was useful(-ish, I haven’t seen The Social Network), it’s mostly been a major distraction and a source of information I really didn’t need to know in my life. Now, Facebook is both a professional and personal tool. Most businesses, musicians, and organizations have Facebook pages. Hey, there are lots of us. Might as well use it.

    (More …)

    EmailShare
     
  • Carter Gibson 4:20 pm on June 17, 2011 Permalink
    Tags: AdLibbing, , , , Campaign, , Facebook, , , Lesson, Management, , , , ,   

    An Intern’s Online Identity 

    People write different ways depending on their audience. For instance, I have begun to frequently write blog posts for The Ad Council’s official blog AdLibbing and am very careful about my language, tone, and content. Afterall, this blog is a great way for me to show off my personality and critical thinking capacities to both my supervisor and high level Ad Council professionals.

    On here, the AU Intern Blog, I was much more casual in my blog posts caring admittedly less about sentence structure and in-depth, personal analysis. Therefore, it was much to my mortification and horror when I saw my first blog post on here sent out to a large part of the Ad Council PR team for reference. It was then that I realized that I’m not just writing for my peers or for a $50 Amazon gift card – I’m writing for my employer as well. This prompted a quick Google search of myself and a frantic effort to protect my online identity.
    (More …)

    EmailShare
     
    • Florian 6:03 pm on June 17, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I can only second what you said about protecting your online identity. Things can come back to haunt you even when you have long forgotten about them. And I know (from sitting in the office with people while this was happening at another internship) that some companies will thoroughly search for your online “resume” more so than looking through your real resume and cover letter.

  • Sarah McIntosh 4:23 am on June 16, 2011 Permalink
    Tags: Facebook, , , Privacy, ,   

    You Need a Harvard Degree to Tell Me That?! 

    Yesterday I headed over to Georgetown Law School with NYRA Executive Director Alex Koroknay-Palicz for the Computers, Freedom and Privacy conference. Alex was speaking on a youth privacy panel hosted by the American Library Association. The intent of the panel hosts was to discuss Facebook and online privacy issues (kids put all their information on the internet these days, etc etc etc) but Alex’s presentation centered around the idea that Facebook isn’t the biggest threat to youth privacy. Teachers, parents, and new technology like GPS phone tracking devices present a much greater threat to privacy.

    (More …)

    EmailShare
     
c
compose new post
j
next post/next comment
k
previous post/previous comment
r
reply
e
edit
o
show/hide comments
t
go to top
l
go to login
h
show/hide help
esc
cancel